Lynnmouth Park Improvements

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Thank you to everyone who attended our public open house at MEC in February and completed our online survey. We are ready to move forward with the next steps in our Lynnmouth Park Improvement project.

WHAT WE HEARD

Generally, there was an even split between respondents supported and respondents who opposed changes to the park.

Supporters liked:

  • the convenient, contained and formal off-leash areas
  • the amenities such as seating and dog waste bins
  • the proposed landscape plan that focuses on native plants and includes a pollinator garden at the park entrance
  • the rationale for the on-leash trail designation and acknowledged the importance for all user groups to feel safe in the park.

Opponents were concerned:

  • that the off-leash areas were too small and would result in degradation of the grass and impact site drainage
  • that the additional fencing would negatively impact the aesthetics of the park.

Review a full summary of the What We Heard. Also see the Revised Off-leash Areas Design Features.

NEXT STEPS

We have refined the original concept plan (Option A) and created a second concept plan (Option B) featuring one larger fenced off-leash area. We are seeking your feedback once again. Voting closes September 7th.

Vote Now


Thank you to everyone who attended our public open house at MEC in February and completed our online survey. We are ready to move forward with the next steps in our Lynnmouth Park Improvement project.

WHAT WE HEARD

Generally, there was an even split between respondents supported and respondents who opposed changes to the park.

Supporters liked:

  • the convenient, contained and formal off-leash areas
  • the amenities such as seating and dog waste bins
  • the proposed landscape plan that focuses on native plants and includes a pollinator garden at the park entrance
  • the rationale for the on-leash trail designation and acknowledged the importance for all user groups to feel safe in the park.

Opponents were concerned:

  • that the off-leash areas were too small and would result in degradation of the grass and impact site drainage
  • that the additional fencing would negatively impact the aesthetics of the park.

Review a full summary of the What We Heard. Also see the Revised Off-leash Areas Design Features.

NEXT STEPS

We have refined the original concept plan (Option A) and created a second concept plan (Option B) featuring one larger fenced off-leash area. We are seeking your feedback once again. Voting closes September 7th.

Vote Now


  • What We Heard

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    30 July, 2020

    What we heard on from you on the Lynnmouth Park Improvement project. See full report.

    What we heard on from you on the Lynnmouth Park Improvement project. See full report.

  • Phase One - Habitat Restoration

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    30 July, 2020

    The first phase of the trail and habitat improvements in Lynnmouth Park focused on re-establishing streamside habitat with native trees and shrub plantings along the west bank of Lynn Creek. Lynn Creek is an important salmon bearing stream and the newly planted vegetation helps support local fish and wildlife populations.

    A number of community stewardship events were held to remove invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed and Himalayan Blackberry which made way for the installation of hundreds new native plants.

    To help establish the new vegetation and protect the environmentally sensitive creek side area, fencing was added which includes three...

    The first phase of the trail and habitat improvements in Lynnmouth Park focused on re-establishing streamside habitat with native trees and shrub plantings along the west bank of Lynn Creek. Lynn Creek is an important salmon bearing stream and the newly planted vegetation helps support local fish and wildlife populations.

    A number of community stewardship events were held to remove invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed and Himalayan Blackberry which made way for the installation of hundreds new native plants.

    To help establish the new vegetation and protect the environmentally sensitive creek side area, fencing was added which includes three formal access points to the creek.



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